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the lottery 1996

The lottery 1996

On his deathbed in the hospital, Jason’s father asks that his ashes be spread over the top of his wife’s grave. Jason, who came to the city with his father at a young age, remembers little of the town or his mother, but he undertakes the charge. It is an idyllic place, but gradually snips of memory return, until he remembers the significance of the fact that most of the tombstones in the town cemetery, including his mothers, bear the same day and month, one death each year. Caught up in the memory of the lottery he saw as a child, and the one he is trapped in today, escape is difficult and retribution is. Written by Bruce Cameron

On his deathbed in the hospital, Jason’s father asks that his ashes be spread over the top of his wife’s grave. Jason, who came to the city with his father at a young age, remembers little of the town or his mother, but he undertakes the charge. It is an idyllic place, but gradually snips of memory return, until he remembers the significance of the fact that most of the tombstones in the town cemetery, including his mothers, bear the same day and month, one death each year. Caught up in the memory of the lottery he saw as a child, and the one he is trapped in today, escape is difficult and retribution is… Written by Bruce Cameron

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The Lottery

Synopsis

On his deathbed in the hospital, Jason’s father asks that his ashes be spread over the top of his wife’s grave. Jason, who came to the city with his father at a young age, remembers little of the town or his mother, but he undertakes the charge. It is an idyllic place, but gradually snips of memory return, until he remembers the significance of the fact that most of the tombstones in the town cemetery, including his mothers, bear the same day and month, one death each year. Caught up in the memory of the lottery he saw as a child, and the one he is trapped in today, escape is difficult and retribution is. Written by Bruce Cameron

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100 mins More details at IMDb TMDb Report this film

Popular reviews

I’m a fan of small towns where everyone goes to church and things seems to be stuck in a forgotten past. There’s something both oddly comforting and mysteriously foreboding about them. I’ve lived and worked in some areas where the townsfolk live by a different code and you know that there aren’t many secrets left to uncover, except by outsiders. There’s a nice subgenre of horror about these mysterious towns, led by superior films like The Stepford Wives and The Wicker Man. This is a highly watchable made-for-TV movie with just enough atmosphere and some good performances. Purists will probably be offended by the trivialization of Shirley Jackson’s classic short story, but this is subtle afternoon viewing with just enough…

Traumatised me as a child when I saw it and it’s just as horrifying to watch as an adult. The ending of this super effective little made-for-tv movie is so hard to watch, nightmarish. It differs a little from Shirley Jackson’s magnificent short story, it’s fleshed out a lot, but the main gist is still there.

Midday movie type stuff, it’s very 90s, but so damn good, and I’ll say it again, actually scary.

This feature-length TV adaptation doesn’t have the impact of Shirley Jackson’s short story but screenwriter Anthony Spinner and director Daniel Sackheim have done a pretty good job of expanding “The Lottery” into a multi-generational thriller that begins when Jason (Dan Cortese) returns to the town where he was born to scatter his father’s ashes on his mother’s grave. The respectable cast (including Keri Russell, Veronica Cartwright, M. Emmet Walsh, Stephen Root and William Daniels) and small town atmosphere help sustain interest while the low budget made-for-TV feel definitely works against it.

As a made-for-TV movie, Dan Sackheim and Anthony Spinner’s adaptation of Shirley Jackson’s short story provides a sound example of a run-of-the-mill suspense film diluted for television audiences. As such, it lacks the sense of shock that accompany’s Jackson’s story. Characterised by its brevity and sudden turn of events that leaves readers breathless and deeply disturbed, Jackson’s short story contains a sense of intrigue that is nestled within such banality that when the horror starts, the reader is fully unprepared and it delivers a heck of a wallop.

Not so in Sackheim’s film, which falls foul to televisual genre conventions that, for its free-to-air audience, requires the inclusion of a cross-section of narrative tropes such as a romance with a…

Recent reviews

I watched this when it came out as a TV movie when I was a kid and I was fucking pissed about it then. I even got into a disagreement with my teacher about it because she tried to say it was good. What a hack!

I double dog dare someone to adapt a Shirley Jackson novel that doesn’t suck ass.

All my love and no offense to Kerri Russell. The one star goes to her.

I found this on YouTube and I decided to give it a try: I have to say is better than I expected. I didn’t know how a short story written by Shirley Jackson could turn into a whole movie, but the writing was clever enough to make it work.

Worth the watch but nothing unforgettable about it.

I like the story and everything, but this movie changes it from the classic short story to something more akin to The Wickerman. Even so, I could have forgiven it if the main character didn’t falk into such a foolish, bullheaded mode atvthe end. He was so irritating. And he dropped Keri Russel like a fool.

Films like this just make me upset 😡

Traumatised me as a child when I saw it and it’s just as horrifying to watch as an adult. The ending of this super effective little made-for-tv movie is so hard to watch, nightmarish. It differs a little from Shirley Jackson’s magnificent short story, it’s fleshed out a lot, but the main gist is still there.

Midday movie type stuff, it’s very 90s, but so damn good, and I’ll say it again, actually scary.

Noted bandanna enthusiast Dan Cortese stars as Jason Smith, a tow truck driver in Boston. After his father dies and his girlfriend breaks up with him to do big business in Chicago, Jason drives to his hometown to scatter his father’s ashes on his mother’s grave. The town, New Hope, is a small town with a secret and that secret is it’s a town where the plot of Shirley Jackson’s short story, “The Lottery,” is happening!

The bulk of this made-for-TV movie is a decent enough mid-90s thriller, with Jason trying to figure out what actually happened to his mother and why everyone in the town acts like they’ve never heard of his father before. The final 30 minutes or…

Τηλεταινία βασισμένη στο ομώνυμο διήγημα της Shirley Jackson, που όταν εκδόθηκε σε περιοδικό έγινε της κακομοίρας, αν και απλώνεται παραπάνω από τις αντοχές του διηγήματος προσθέτει κομμάτια “ιστορίας” και προσπαθεί να κάνει καλή δουλειά , μπόνους Κάρι Ράσελ στα νιάτα της , τσιρζ!

Pretty entertaining I guess. Nothing groundbreaking but I was thoroughly engaged.

This feature-length TV adaptation doesn’t have the impact of Shirley Jackson’s short story but screenwriter Anthony Spinner and director Daniel Sackheim have done a pretty good job of expanding “The Lottery” into a multi-generational thriller that begins when Jason (Dan Cortese) returns to the town where he was born to scatter his father’s ashes on his mother’s grave. The respectable cast (including Keri Russell, Veronica Cartwright, M. Emmet Walsh, Stephen Root and William Daniels) and small town atmosphere help sustain interest while the low budget made-for-TV feel definitely works against it.

As a made-for-TV movie, Dan Sackheim and Anthony Spinner’s adaptation of Shirley Jackson’s short story provides a sound example of a run-of-the-mill suspense film diluted for television audiences. As such, it lacks the sense of shock that accompany’s Jackson’s story. Characterised by its brevity and sudden turn of events that leaves readers breathless and deeply disturbed, Jackson’s short story contains a sense of intrigue that is nestled within such banality that when the horror starts, the reader is fully unprepared and it delivers a heck of a wallop.

Not so in Sackheim’s film, which falls foul to televisual genre conventions that, for its free-to-air audience, requires the inclusion of a cross-section of narrative tropes such as a romance with a…

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On his deathbed in the hospital, Jason's father asks that his ashes be spread over the top of his wife's grave. Jason, who came to the city with his father at a young age, remembers little of the town or his mother, but he undertakes the charge. It is an idyllic place, but gradually snips of memory return, until he remembers the significance of the fact that most of the tombstones in the town cemetery, including his mothers, bear the same day and month, one death each year. Caught up in the memory of the lottery he saw as a child, and the one he is trapped in today, escape is difficult and retribution is… Written by Bruce Cameron ]]>